There is a Lexicon of Wisdom

Posts tagged ‘Advertising’

Bathroom Mirror Advertising

Airports are no strangers to advertising. Tons of traditional advertising can be seen inside any given airport. A few years ago, Zappos.com even started advertising in security bins.

Now the bathrooms are going to be taken over. Clear Channel Airports has partnered with Mirrus to create bathroom mirror advertisements. The ads are starting to appear at Chicago’s O’Hare airport, and are already in sports stadiums in Texas, Georgia, Virginia, and North Carolina. Soon the ads will be everywhere. Once finished, the O’Hare airport will have 150 40’’ digital advertising mirror displays that feature HD stills and/or videos.


Current advertisers include Pepsi, Geico, Illy Coffee, Microsoft, Pledge, Zappos.com, Spanx, and Dove Men.

The ads are complete with sensors that track in real time which ads are being seen, how many times they are seen, and for how long. Before a consumer walks up to the mirror, the ad takes up the entire mirror. As the consumer approaches the mirror, the ad minimizes to the upper left hand corner.


While some are complaining about the new mirrors, they have been in Japan since 2006 and no one has been harmed. In fact, since you already have to be a Jedi Master to work a public bathroom, the shrinking mirror ads only make sense. To flush a toilet, just move away from the sensor. As you approach the mirror, the ads shrink. To operate the faucet, soap dispenser, and paper towel dispenser simply wave your hand. Now, if someone finally installs automatic doors we could have a completely touch free experience!


Below is a video of a man testing out the new mirrors in a football stadium.





Regardless of whether people hate the ads or love the ads, they get people talking. They create word-of-mouth, which can be more important than the actual ad itself.

QR Code Examples




By now you have seen at least one QR Code in a magazine, on a billboard, or on a product you purchased. They are everywhere now. QR stands for quick response. Technically, “A Quick Response code is a two-dimensional code that can be scanned by smartphone cameras to automatically pull up text, photos, videos, music, and URLs.” Not so technically, they are pretty cool, or at least let users do pretty cool things! Below are several examples of QR Codes.




Calvin Klein-


This Calvin Klein billboard features a huge red QR Code and says ‘Get it Uncensored’. Scanning the billboard leads to an uncensored 40-second video for CK’s Fall 2010 Jeans X commercial featuring Lara Stone.




New York Department of Sanitation-





I think this is kind of cool (although I’m not sure anyone will get close enough to a garbage truck for it to work). In New York, the Department of Sanitation has placed QR Codes on 2,200 of their garbage trucks. These QR codes lead to a video about how to recycle by Howcast.




Walgreens-




I’m not sure I should talk about this since my fiancé works for a competing pharmacy and doesn’t really care for Walgreens, but hey, it’s a good idea! By downloading the Walgreens Mobile app, you can quickly refill your prescriptions by scanning the QR code on your bottle. I love this. I hate typing in numbers to an automated system to refill my prescriptions. I would much rather just take a picture of my bottle and hit refill. I look for this to become more widespread among pharmacies.




Little Big Planet-




Little Big Planet has a site where users can search for users and levels. One of the features of this site is the QR Codes. Searching for levels on the PS3 can get time consuming. Users can quickly go to this site, search for the level or user, bring up the QR Code and take a picture of it with the PlayStation Eye. This will automatically bring up the level. The picture featured here is for one of my levels, Neon Nights!




There are tons of QR Code readers on the iPhone App store and in the Android Market, many are free. Pick one up and go scan some codes. They lead to some pretty cool stuff. Some of them are even designer codes, like this Louis Vuitton code.



Although sometimes these fancier codes are hard for readers to read.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: